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Pasadena Psychotherapist

“Isn’t it just a chemical imbalance, shouldn’t I take medication to fix it?”  Constantly hearing the thousands of commercials selling drugs for all kinds of problems, you can fully understand where we get this notion! Better living through chemistry, right?  You feel down, take a pill. You have a headache, take a pill. Your child is annoying, give em’ a pill. And in many cases, drugs have made our lives easier and have eased the suffering of millions. But are mental health issues really just a result of a brain chemistry?

What is the cause of mental illness? Is it a chemical imbalance? Perhaps a genetic predisposition, or maybe the result of life experience? While we need more research, a picture is beginning to emerge that the answer is Yes! All three! In order to develop a mental illness you probably will have some sort of genetic predisposition, have had a negative life experience (i.e. trauma, difficult childhood) that turned on those genes, and then a resulting chemical imbalance in the brain that we can actually measure. But is it in fact the chemical imbalance that is the problem and the best target for intervention?

Lets look to mother nature for some clarity here. Take any plant. If the leaves are turning brown and falling off, we know the plant is sick. We can see it, measure it (just like a lack of serotonin in the brain). Is then the best course of action to stick on some new leaves, or to inject some chlorophyll into the stem? That might work for a bit. The leaves might look healthier, and as long as we keep injecting chlorophyll, all will be well. But what is at the “root” (pardon the pun) of the problem. A lack of chlorophyll? Or is it perhaps something to do with this particular plant being planted in the wrong place? Perhaps a lack of nutrients in the soil, not enough water or sunlight! Holistic Psychotherapy

Depression and its accompanying shift in neurochemistry is a result of a lack of nutrients in our lives. Something is wrong, and our body tells us this via depression. We can take a med and feel better, but the nutrient is still missing. We will still feel depressed if we stop taking it. Depression, anxiety, addictions, phobias, and obsessions are our body/mind/spirit’s way of getting our attention that something needs to change. We need to be fed!

By just treating the symptoms, we miss the real origin of the problem. At Tree of Life Healing, we treat the whole person, body, mind and spirit. While relieving symptoms is paramount, we also work to heal the real cause of your problem. Drop by on November 10 for our Healing Arts Salon and sample up to five 15-minute healing sessions with some of Pasadena’s most talented healing practitioners including Somatic Psychology, Reiki, Massage, EFT, and Sound Healing.

Pasadena PsychotherapistChris Tickner, MFT (at Tree of Life Healing) is a Pasadena psychotherapistchild therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, combining mindfulness psychotherapy, somatic psychotherapyneuroscience, and good old fashion humor and compassion to form a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic. At Tree of Life Healing, Pasadena’s Holistic and Alternative Healing Resource, we provide an array of treatment approaches including Somatic Psychology, Jungian Psychotherapy, group therapy, Hakomi Psychotherapy, Reiki Energy Therapy, Shamanic Healing, Intuitive Counseling, and more.

 

You’ve seen those commercials on TV where one person does something nice for someone, who in turn does something nice for someone else? While I have no idea what they’re selling, a study published recently in the online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that there is some evidence that there is a contagion effect for kindness! You really can Pay It Forward!

What the research shows is that we are potentially wired for contagious cooperative behavior, both good and bad (picture two scenes, one of looters during a riot, and one of strangers jumping into the sea to save a whale). When one individual allows another to, say, merge in front of them in traffic, that person is likely to allow the next three mergers he encounters to come in front of him, and so on, until you have an entire society of curteous drivers! All it takes is one person to start the chain.

The research was conducted by James Fowler of UC San Diego and Nicholas Christakis of Harvard, who also coauthored “Connected: The Surprising Power of Our Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives.” In the current study, Fowler and Christakis demonstrated that when one person was genrous with money in a “public-goods game,” the players benefiting from their generosity where in turn more likely to give their own money away. This kindness spreads first to three people, then to nine, then to 27 and so on.

An important part of the study was that both positive and negative behaviors followed a contagious path! We have the power to spread both good and bad in the world. So maybe just keep that in mind the next time you find yourself late for work and decide to not let that annoying person merge in front of you. Just don’t be surprised if the next time you’re trying to merge, you also get the short end of the stick. What goes around really does come around! Karma man!

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

There comes a point and time in every growing therapist’s development when they have to let go of all the tools and tricks. They have to trust that what they have learned is now second nature, and rest into the moment, into the relationship with their client. The following story details that moment in my life.

When Tony was just two days old, the Department of Child and Family Services removed him from the care of his mother as she tested positive for cocaine and other substances. He was immediately placed into foster care and into the home of a foster mother with at least four other children. He was removed from that home due to allegations of neglect when he was eleven months, and over the next two years spent time in at least three other foster homes. By the time Tony was three, the impact of multiple placements, neglect, and exposure to drugs when in his mother’s womb was obvious. He would rock himself, bang his head on the wall or headboard of his bed. He was difficult to soothe, oppositional, would have several severe tantrums every day. His caregivers at the time struggled to find ways to control him.

Tony stayed in one foster home from the time he was three until he was six and entered grade school for the first time. Unfortunately, with school came a whole host of other problems. Unlike other kids his age, Tony had no idea how to get along with friends, how to understand their feelings, how to show empathy. He would tease, threaten, bully, physically attack, and provoke his peers. His teachers struggled to control him, and eventually Tony was expelled from school in the first grade, still at the age of six. Also at this time, his foster family had had enough and gave what’s called a 7-day notice. This basically means that they are giving DCFS a week to find a new home for Tony. They did, and Tony was placed in a residential care facility, an RCL-14 facility, the highest level of such care in the state short of psychiatric hospitalization.

At the young age of six, Tony was placed in a facility with 60 other boys, ages 6-17. He was the youngest and the smallest. This is when I met Tony for the first time. I had just started working at this home as an intern, and had been assigned a caseload of 7 boys. Tony was now one of my clients. My job, as a clinician, was to provide individual therapy. My background had been in somatic psychology, and I was used to working with high functioning adults. I had no idea what to do with these kids. We received some rudimentary training and were advised to stick with cognitive behavioral approaches, as they were shown to be the most efficacious. I felt like a foreigner in a strange land.

And so, I started to work with Tony in such a manner, working specifically on his behaviors, creating behavior charts, incentive programs, dissecting his thinking and his decision making. I had mood and feeling charts, anger management games, and consequential thinking development tools. Yet I knew I was missing something. Somewhere in the back of mind, or maybe in my heart, I knew that I wasn’t reaching him, that I wasn’t meeting his needs. He was frustrated with me, bored. Our sessions were tedious, I hated them. I didn’t look forward to seeing him and began to resent for the feelings I was having. How dare this little kid make me feel so inadequate!

One day, I received a call from our crisis unit. Tony had run away again, left school in a rage, and ran out into the neighborhood. He was gone for several hours before they found him and brought him back. As was standard protocol in such situations, I was required to come down to the crisis unit and perform a safety and risk evaluation with Tony. I brought him back to my office and started to ask him the standard questions on the form, “On a scale from 1-10, how angry are you?” “10!” “OK, 10. Complete this sentence, I feel like hurting myself never, sometimes, or all of the time.” “All of the time!” Tony was getting angrier and angrier. So was I. This wasn’t working, and I knew it. As I proceeded to follow the standard protocol, to keep within the bounds of what was expected of me, he began to escalate. Finally, he had enough, stood up on top of his chair, and screamed through his tears “Why won’t you just be with me!”

In that moment, I melted. I dropped all the cognitive behavioral facade, and I trusted my body and my feelings to do what was right. There before me was a tiny, tired, terrified little boy. He had never had a mother, or a father, he didn’t know how to get along with people, he didn’t know how to be civilized. He did however know that he need something. In an instant I saw the infant in him, crying to be held. I cried. I put down my clipboard, looked deeply into his eyes. I opened my arms and said nothing. It took only a moment, he felt the shift, and came running towards me, falling into my arms. He sobbed and so did I. My body knew exactly what to do, and it was not on any chart, or form, or strategic plan. He needed to be held, as if he were an infant. And so I held him, rocked him, soothed him for what felt like hours. He eventually fell asleep in my arms.

This story illustrates what has been shown to be the most important predictor of a positive therapeutic experience. When all is said and done, it is not the theoretical orientation, nor the specific interventions, that make therapy good. It is the quality of the relationship, the attachment, between therapist and client, that allows the client to feel safe, respected, accepted, and builds the ground for change. Tony was met by me when I simply allowed myself to be with him.

I worked with Tony for several years after that. After that moment, our work deepened, and I kept trusting myself that I knew instinctively what to do for this little guy. When our paths parted, his life continued to be a struggle, in and out of group homes and foster care. I’ve lost touch with Tony. He is now probably 18 or so. I can only hope that those moments of deep attachment and attunement made some difference in his chaotic life.

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

Every year around this time, as the days of summer come to a close, and school gets underway, I get a series of phone calls from concerned and panicked parents. Often they’ve received a phone call from a teacher or school counselor, or returned from a parent teacher conference, and have learned that their child is having trouble at school! It can be a painful moment. Filled with confusion and at times embarrassment, these parents reach out for help.

Problem-Child_lOne such case sticks out in my mind as a clear example of how our system for helping kids is extremely misguided, and often does more harm than good. James was an 10-year-old boy whose parents called me one October day, expressing their frustration with him, with his school, and with themselves. Up until this point, James had been a star student, was well liked by his peers and teachers, and expressed joy and satisfaction with his own progress at school. However, as he entered the fifth grade, everything seemed to change.

One day, his parents received a phone call from his new teacher, informing them that James was disruptive in the classroom, was often out of his seat and seemed to be unable to pay attention. He was observed to stare off into space, and often didn’t respond to his teacher’s prompts. Additionally he often talked out of turn without raising his hand, and was a distraction to the other children. As a quick remedy, the teacher had moved James to a desk that was away from the other kids, in the back of the room. The teacher thought he might have Attention Deficit Disorder and suggested they have him evaluated by a doctor. Both parents reported that at home James was also showing some new behaviors. He didn’t want to go to bed at his bedtime, he was often short-tempered and clingy.

The parents called me for a consultation, not wanting to have their child placed on medication. I sat down with the two of them, gathered my usual background information, and provided an overview of child behavior to the parents. When a child’s behavior changes this is a sign for us as adults to pay close attention. Without the ability to communicate what is bothering them, a child will express his fears, or angers, by acting out. In this way, child behavior becomes a code of sorts that adults must learn to decipher. What is James trying to tell us by this behavior?

We reviewed the past several weeks and I learned that James had not had the usual restful summer that he was used to. Most parents often minimize the impact significant events will have on their children, and this was no exception. They both indicated that  the summer seemed to be a pretty good one.  Jim, the father, explained that his mother had been ill for many years, and finally passed away in August. The family traveled back to her home in Chicago, and attended the wake and funeral. They both indicated that James seemed fine, didn’t really cry, and was very polite and grown up. Susan, the mother, then explained that they returned to their La Canada, CA home just in time to witness the Station Fire burn over 160,000 acres! “It was amazing. We were fine, I mean, we had to be evacuated for about three days, but it was really OK. We got all the important stuff, our pets, papers, and all piled in the car and treated it like an unexpected bonus vacation. James seemed really excited and had a great time!” 

While James appeared to be “fine” and seemed to enjoy himself or not be too significantly impacted, he clearly was, and was now showing signs of traumatic impact. Many children who go through painful, even frightening experiences, will show little if any initial signs of suffering. Like James, it might be weeks later, when confronted with a stressful experience, that these emotions will surface as behavior. What’s more, children are significantly impacted by how their parents react to various situations, and while his grandmother’s death was a great relief to the family, it was also a significant event, and both Jim and Susan responded with the expected grief, sadness and even anger. While these emotions are understood as normal to an adult, to a child, who has never experienced death, they can be terrifying. Throw in the fire and the evacuation, and you have a clear case of a child who has been overwhelmed by fear, stress and trauma.

James’ behaviors in the classroom were the gateway to understanding that he was having a hard time focusing on school because he was still trying to process the difficult experiences he had at the end of his summer. Once we figured that out, I worked with the parents to help them make room for James’s processing of his grief and fear. Art projects, games, looking at pictures of Grandma, talking about the fires, were all ways they helped James make sense of what had happened to him. I worked with James in therapy for several weeks, primarily using play therapy to help him process, express and understand his feelings. Additionally, the parents approached his teacher and explained what was going on. They asked him to be patient with James, and instead of isolating him in the back of the room, to consider moving his desk closer to him. What James needed was comfort and understanding, not punishment and shame.

This case illustrates how easy it is for teachers and parents to quickly make assumptions about a child’s behavior. If Jim and Susan had taken James to their doctor, a stimulant like Ritalin would most likely have been prescribed to help James focus in the classroom. And while that might have helped, the underlying issues of grief and trauma would have gone untreated. This is often the first step down a long road of medication adjustments, special education classrooms, Individualized Education Plans (IEP’s), non-public schools, and more.

The moral of the story? Listen to your child’s behavior, become a detective. Ask yourself what is he trying to communicate? What would make anybody act the way he is acting? Find the missing piece, figure out what the need is (ie to express underlying painful emotions), and then provide it. Once the missing experience is had, the child will begin to return to themselves, the behavior will begin to diminish and he will return to the confident, health and happy child he deserves to be.

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

And breathe 2, 3, 4…

breathing

In this, the third of a four-part series on stress reduction, we will focus on treating the cause of stress.

 

Remember that stress is an automatic response to a perceived threat. This perception is based on our previous life experience. If we had an encounter with an aggressive dog as a child, for example, we might still be afraid of dogs as an adult.

 

 In order to reduce stress, therefore, we must find a way to change our perceptions. This requires mindfulness, the ability to be clear and present in a given moment, free from judgment, criticism or intense emotions. When we develop this ability, we find that we become intimately aware of our own perceptions and thoughts. For example, as an adult we can become aware that our fear of dogs is from our childhood, and certainly should not rule our lives as adults. Once we understand this, we can change our lives. Maybe we might discover we love dogs. Replace this dog example with any stressful situation in your life. You have the power to change the way you react. This power is mindfulness.

 

Mindfulness can be cultivated in many ways including meditation, yoga, exercise, and spiritual practice. Try the following brief introduction to meditation.

 

Sit comfortably, or lie down. Start to notice your breath. There is no need to do or change anything. Just keep your attention on your breath. Eventually, a thought will come. When you notice you are thinking, don’t judge it, don’t indulge it. Just note it, and gently return your awareness to your breath. Do this for several minutes.

 

Cultivating mindfulness is not relaxation! It requires energy and discipline. It takes courage and intention to be open to knowing ourselves on such an intimate level. Research shows that mindfulness reduces stress, increases compassion for self and others, and promotes feelings of peacefulness and improved self-esteem. All of this leads to a more relaxed way of life.

 

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy

 

goat2What Gets Your Goat??

What stresses you out the most? The kids, traffic, work, money… everything? You’re not alone! We all experience stress to some degree. Have you felt more stressed over the past few months? Most of us have, with all the turmoil in the economy, the threat of global warming. In fact, research indicates that over the past several years, since the terrorist attacks of 2001, there has been a nation-wide increase in stress levels and related psychological disorders including Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and increased rates of alcohol and drug abuse.

Remember that stress is our natural, automatic response to perceived danger. It can keep us alive! In our modern society however, our stress response is often continuous. Every day we see violent images on the news and are bombarded with stories of death and destruction. Many people walk around in a constant fear state, and are in general stressed-out much of the time!

Many illnesses have been linked to chronic stress including heart disease, high blood pressure, hypertension, high cholesterol, stroke, diabetes, skin irritations, weight gain, and migraine headaches. Stress can make your back, jaw and head ache, leave you with a lowered sex drive and disrupt your appetite and sleeping patterns. Our immune system suffers leaving us vulnerable to colds and flues, and slowing the healing process. Emotionally, stress can leave us feeling irritable, anxious, and depressed and leads to increased rates of homicide and suicide.

What symptoms of stress do you experience in your life? Take a few moments and write down your experience. And tune in next time when we start to explore ways you can immediately decrease stress in your life and in the lives of those you care about.

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

Stress Reduction – Part One: Take A Chill Pill!!

zenWe’ve all heard it before. Stress is bad! We need to fight it! But if you’re like most people, it’s not a priority, and you probably don’t know the whole story.

In this four-part series we will learn exactly what stress is, why it’s sometimes bad, and what we can do to protect ourselves from its damaging effects.

The stress response is a built-in, hard wired, survival mechanism that allows us to respond to perceived threats quickly and effectively. It’s the same mechanism that allows animals in nature to escape attack. When our brains perceive a threat, our body automatically responds. Ever pull your hand out of hot water and then feel the pain? It wasn’t the pain that made you pull it out. It was the stress response automatically protecting you.

When our brain senses danger, its starts a neurochemical chain reaction. Adrenaline and other chemicals course through our bodies. Systems that are unnecessary start to slow down, including digestion, reproduction and immune protection. Our heart and breathing rates increase. Our muscles become stronger and more effective. Our senses become more precise allowing us to be more alert. All this so we can either run away from or fight whatever is threatening us.  

In nature, once the animal has escaped, his systems return to normal. But for us, confronted daily with violent and disturbing images in the media, more and more traffic, and a polluted environment, we stay stressed. This is where things go wrong for us. A mechanism that is supposed to keep us alive ends up making us sick.

Take time now to notice the level of stress in your life. Write down at least three things that really make you feel stressed out!

Next time we’ll look more closely at how stress can negatively impact us.

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

Reverse PsychologyIt’s becoming increasingly popular to look for a therapist on the Internet. But how can you tell if a therapist is any good by reading their bio or looking at their picture? What are important things to look for?

Here are some important tips to help you find the perfect therapist. Keep in mind that research tells us that it is a therapist’s ability to build a genuine, trusting and meaningful relationship that is most likely to lead to client satisfaction. It has less to do with their training, orientation, or degree level.

Easy Steps

1. Use the therapist finders on the left hand column to locate therapists in your area. Keep in mind that if you go weekly, you’ll want your therapist to be close to your home or work.

2. Limit the list to things that are must haves: gender, age, rate and availability, insurance coverage.

3. Make a short list of at least five therapists and call them. How do they sound on their outgoing message? Do they return your call promptly? Do you feel comfortable with them on the phone? Ask them questions about their practice, how long they’ve been practicing, do they specialize in anything? Give them an idea of what you would be coming for and ask for their input.

4. Set up introductory sessions with at least three therapists. During these sessions see how you feel. Are you comfortable, is this the kind of person you can see yourself spilling your guts with, do you feel respected and important? A good therapist will make you feel heard, understood and hopeful in that first session. If you aren’t feeling this right away, move on!

5. Sleep on it. We tend to make good, solid decisions after a good night’s sleep. Pick your therapist and make your first appointment!

And that’s it! While it’s not always necessary to be this exhaustive, this is a sure fire way to find the therapist that is most likely to meet your needs. Just keep in mind that the key ingredient is your comfort level. If you don’t feel safe right away, chances are you won’t, and looking for someone that does can save you a lot of time, and money!

Good luck, and feel free to call or email if you need help or referrals.

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

Announcing Our New Blog!

CRW_2376Hello everyone! Welcome to our new blog! We’ve had lots of requests to provide our clients, colleagues and the general public with frequent updates on what is new in the world of holistic/somatic psychotherapy in and around Pasadena, CA. Well, we’ve gone a step further and hope to provide you with a comprehensive holistic resource guide. Stay tuned as we bring you articles, workshop and group listings, and referrals to local, holistically oriented businesses and practitioners. Welcome, and let us know what you think!

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

Somatic Psychology (body mind psychotherapy, body-oriented psychotherapy, etc.) is a holistic form of therapy that respects and utilizes the powerful connection between body, mind and spirit. How we are in this world, how we relate to ourselves and others, is not just purely about the mind or our thoughts, but is also deeply rooted in our bodies and our spirits.

Somatic Psychology has a long and rich history and is primarily derived from the theories and practices of Wilhelm Reich, a psychoanalyst and student of Sigmund Freud. Since that time, it has been influenced by existential, humanistic and gestalt psychology, dance, movement and art therapy, family and systems theory, biology, neurology, and Far Eastern philosophy and spirituality.

Individuals seek this form of treatment for similar reasons they might look to more traditional talk therapy, to address stress, anxiety, depression, relationship and sexuality issues, grief and loss, addictions, trauma including abuse recovery, as well as more purely medical reasons including pain, headaches, and chronic fatigue syndrome.

Somatic Psychotherapy includes many different techniques that can be utilized depending on the specific needs of each client. Such interventions can include developing mindfulness and awareness of one’s physical presence using relaxation and meditative techniques; movement in order to promote a deeper physical awareness and to expand one’s capacity to feel and express emotions; breathing techniques to increase awareness of and improve functioning of the breath.

Check out this video of Wilhelm Reich’s life and work!

Chris Tickner is a Pasadena psychotherapist, child therapist, and clinical supervisor practicing holistic psychotherapy, where he combines mindfulness psychotherapy,  somatic therapy, neuroscience, and good old fasion humor and compassion to form a a powerful treatment that is transformative and holistic.  There are thousands of California psychotherapists, and finding a counselor or finding a therapist can be daunting. On his website, Chris provides a primer to help you find the therapist that is perfect for you! Chris is also a Pasadena therapist specializing in anxiety psychotherapy and depression psychotherapy.

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